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Academic Publishing

Best practices and pitfalls to avoid in the academic publishing process

A Predatory Twist in Publishing

Credit: Eduardo Luzzatti

Kolata, Gina. "In Academia, a Predatory Twist in Publishing." New York Times, Late Edition (East Coast) ed., Oct 31 2017

Selected Scholarly Articles

Asadi, A., Rahbar, N., Rezvani, M. J., & Asadi, F. (2018). “Fake/Bogus Conferences: Their Features and Some Subtle Ways to Differentiate Them from Real Ones.” Science and Engineering Ethics, 24(2), 779–784. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11948-017-9906-2 

Bohannon, J. (2013). “Who's Afraid of Peer Review?” Science, 342(6154), 60–65. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.342.6154.60  

Bowman, J. D. (2014). "Predatory Publishing, Questionable Peer Review, and Fraudulent Conferences." American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 78(10), 1-6. ProQuest.

Craft, A. R. (2016). “Is This a Quality Journal to Publish In? How Can You Tell?” Serials Review, 42(3), 237–239. https://doi.org/10.1080/00987913.2016.1196844

Cress, P. E. (2017). “Are Predatory Conferences the Dark Side of the Open Access Movement?” Aesthetic Surgery Journal, 37(6), 734–738. https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjw247 

Dadkhah, M., Jazi, M., & Pacukaj, S. (2015). “Fake Conferences for Earning Real Money.” Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 6(2), 11. Retrieved from http://www.mcser.org/journal/index.php/mjss/article/view/5778

Eve, M. P., & Priego, E. (2017). “Who is actually harmed by Predatory Publishers?” Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society, 15(2), 755-770. https://doi.org/10.31269/triplec.v15i2.867

Forero, D.A., Oermann, M.H., Manca, A., Deriu, F., Mendieta-Zerón, H., Dadkhah, M., Bhad, R., Deshpande, S.N., Wang, W. and Cifuentes, M.P. (2018). “Negative Effects of “Predatory” Journals on Global Health Research.” Annals of Global Health, 84(4), 584–589. https://agh.ubiquitypress.com/articles/10.29024/aogh.2389/  

Hemmat Esfe, M., Wongwises, S., Asadi, A., & Akbari, M. (2015). “Fake Journals: Their Features and Some Viable Ways to Distinguishing Them.” Science & Engineering Ethics, 21(4), 821–824. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11948-014-9595-z

Huffman, J. (2017). “Publisher Package and Open Access Journals: Are Any of Them Predatory?” The Serials Librarian, 73:3-4, 248-268. https://doi.org/10.1080/0361526X.2017.1389796   

Negahdary, M. (2017). "Identifying Scientific High Quality Journals and Publishers." Publishing Research Quarterly, 33(4), 456–470. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12109-017-9541-4   

Pawar, M. (2018). “Predatory conferences: Caveat emptor!” Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology, 32(8), e308–e309. https://doi.org/10.1111/jdv.14855

Shamseer, L., et al. (2017). “Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison.” BMC Medicine, 15, 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-017-0785-9

Singh, S., & Remenyi, D. (2016). "Researchers Beware of Predatory and Counterfeit Journals: Are Academics Gullible?" Electronic Journal of Business Research Methods, 14(1), 50–59. https://issuu.com/academic-conferences.org/docs/ejbrm-volume14-issue1-article435?mode=a_p

Wager E. (2017). “Why We Should Worry Less About Predatory Publishers and More About the Quality of Research and Training at Our Academic Institutions.” Journal of Epidemiology, 27(3), 87–88. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.je.2017.01.001